Yearly Incidence Data

This article refers to partner abuse (not the more inclusive category of domestic abuse). “Partner” may mean husband or wife, or it may mean any girlfriend or boyfriend. There is no requirement that the partner in question is a co-habitee.

The data given here focuses on the percentages of respondents reporting the offence in the last year immediately prior to the survey year in question. Such “last year” data is generally held to be more indicative than reports of lifetime incidence because of the unreliability of memory over long time periods.

All Partner Abuse Excluding Sexual Abuse and Stalking

Data is for the 12 months preceding the survey (percentage of respondents of each sex reporting abuse)

Year Male victims Female victims
2009/10 2.6% 4.6%
2010/11 2.8% 4.6%
2011/12 3.0% 4.2%
2012/13 2.8% 4.0%
2013/14 2.3% 4.3%
2014/15 2.1% 4.3%

These data were obtained by subtracting partner-stalking incidence from all non-sexual partner abuse incidence.

Emotional/Financial Partner Abuse (only)

Data is for the 12 months preceding the survey (percentage of respondents of each sex reporting abuse)

Year Male victims Female victims
2009/10 1.5% (2.4%) 1.8% (4.6%)
2010/11 1.4% (2.1%) 1.9% (4.4%)
2011/12 1.6% (2.6%) 2.0% (4.7%)
2012/13 1.6% (1.9%) 2.0% (4.5%)
2013/14 unknown (1.8%) unknown (4.2%)
2014/15 1.0% (1.5%) 2.2% (4.0%)

The first figure in each case was obtained by subtracting the data for all threats and force categories from the total non-sexual partner abuse data. Hence, this figure can be interpreted as an affirmative answer to one or more of options 1 to 4 in the list given in Offence Category Definitions but a negative answer to the other questions, i.e., when abuse consists solely of the emotional/financial categories with no threats or force applying. The second figure (in brackets) was obtained directly from the CSEW, e.g., in the 2013/14 CSEW, Table 4.04. It is not clear why the two figures disagree.

The first figures for 2012/13 were derived by factoring the “partner abuse (non-sexual)” victimisation rates of Table 4.2 by the percentages in Table 4.6 (referring to the 2012/13 CSEW).

Partner Abuse – Force or Severe Force

Data is for the 12 months preceding the survey (percentage of respondents of each sex reporting abuse). Data up to 2012/13 is that categorised as “severe force”, excluding minor force. Data from 2013/14 is that for the single reported category “force”. There is therefore a discontinuity in the trending at this year.

Year Male victims Female victims
2009/10 severe 0.8% 1.5%
2010/11 severe 1.0% 1.5%
2011/12 severe 1.1% 1.3%
2012/13 severe 1.0% 1.1%
2013/14 force 1.2% 2.0%
2014/15 force 1.0% 1.9%

The 2012/13 data were derived by factoring the “partner abuse (non-sexual)” victimisation rates of Table 4.2 by the percentages in Table 4.6 (referring to the 2012/13 CSEW).

It is curious that the breakdown of the “force” category into “minor” and “severe” was discontinued in 2013/14 just as the prevalence of severe force reached equity between the two sexes. Only the combined “force” category was reported in 2013/14.

The sum of the “minor” and “severe” abuse data, obtained from the individual CSEWs between 2009 and 2013, differ from the total force category reported in the 2013/14 CSEW (Table 4.04). Whilst this is explicable, it is noteworthy that the difference accentuates the sex disparity. Interested parties exert continual pressure to tweak the details of the CSEW reporting to suit their ideological agenda. The comparison is,

Percentage of Victims of Each Sex

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13
Men Wmn Men Wmn Men Wmn Men Wmn
minor 0.5 1.6 0.7 1.4 0.6 1.3 0.6 1.0
severe 0.8 1.5 1.0 1.5 1.1 1.3 1.0 1.1
sum 1.3 3.1 1.7 2.9 1.7 2.6 1.6 2.1
13/14 report total 0.9 2.9 1.1 2.8 1.4 3.0 1.1 2.1

The relative prevalence of severe assaults between the sexes can be discerned from the data on Incidence by Injury

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