Incidence by Demographic

The incidence of partner abuse and domestic abuse by demographic is examined here, considering the incidence by age, by income and by marital status.

Age

The incidence of domestic assault by age in 1995 shown below was taken from the 1999 Home Office Research Study 191 (HORS 191) Domestic Violence: Findings from a new British Crime Survey self-completion questionnaire by Catriona Mirrlees-Black.

DV by age 1995

The equivalent for 2013/14 is taken from the ONS “Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences, 2013/14”, Appendix Table 4.09.

DV by age 2013_14

The tendency for domestic abuse to be greater the younger the age of the victim is clear, though less emphatic in 2013/14 than it was in 1995.

Confining attention to partner abuse, this is also more frequent for younger couples, though the age dependence is less strong than for all domestic abuse. (Data again taken from ONS “Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences, 2013/14”, Appendix Table 4.09)

PV by age 2013_14

Income

The incidence of domestic assault in 1995 against household income is taken from Figure 4.3 of the 1999 Home Office Research Study 191 (HORS 191) Domestic Violence: Findings from a new British Crime Survey self-completion questionnaire by Catriona Mirrlees-Black.

PV by income 1995

For year 2007, the Home Office Statistical Bulletin, “Homicides, Firearm Offences and Intimate Violence 2007/08: Supplementary Volume 2 to Crime in England and Wales 2008/09  (Third Edition)”, Table 3.16, gives the following incidence of partner violence against income.

PV by income 2007

For year 2013/14, the ONS “Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences, 2013/14”, Appendix Table 4.10 gives the following data,

PV by income 20013_14

The preceding three histograms show that domestic or partner abuse against women is more common in the lowest socioeconomic classes. There is a similar, but weaker, tendency for male victims.

Marital Status

In year 2013/14, the ONS “Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences, 2013/14”, Appendix Table 4.09 indicates a very marked variation of the incidence of partner abuse according to marital status. The data relates to incidents in the previous year.

PV by marital status 2013_14

A similar pattern was found in the following year’s survey (2014/15 ONS “Focus on: Violent Crime and Sexual Offences, year ending 2015 – Bulletin Tables”, Figure 4.7). The data again relates to incidents in the previous year, not to lifetime incidents.

PV by marital status 2015_15

Remarkably, married couples account for just 5% or 6% of partner abuse. The bulk of the partner abuse is classed in the above data as “separated” or “divorced”. However, it is not entirely clear whether the abuse in question happened before or after separation/divorce. This would bear further investigation since there is a suggestion that the bulk of partner abuse might be related to the process of separation/divorce.

I do not know what the partner abuse categorised as “widowed” means. Presumably it does not refer to abuse by a ghost. I assume it must mean abuse by an ex-partner who has since died. But the data refers to the last year, so both the abuse and the perpetrator’s subsequent death must have occurred in the last year. Odd?

Related links (open in this tab)